The Documerica Project

In 1971, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency started The Documerica Project, with the intent to document the adverse effects of modern life on the environment that swept the American landscape. More than 70 renowned photographers, which included Danny Lyon, Bill Strode and John H. White, were assigned by the Agency to capture urban cityscapes, scenes of natural beauty as well as everyday life through their respective interpretations while preserving a distinct visual record of time and place.

This week, In Focus revisited the monumental project and showcased a photo series of selected images based on the geographical area they were taken. Below are my favorites from each of the series.

 via  (New York City)

via (New York City)

 via  (The Southwest)

via (The Southwest)

 via  (Chicago's African-American Community)

via (Chicago's African-American Community)

 via  (Texas)

via (Texas)

 via  (The Pacific Northwest)

via (The Pacific Northwest)

Alex Webb interview

Thank you, Internet.

I just stumbled upon a very insightful interview with Alex Webb, one of my favorite photographers of all time, in which he explains his approach to street photography.

Few interesting quotes:

"...I sense the possibility of a picture. It might be a group of people, it might be the look of a corner, I can’t say what it might be until I see it. It’s all about having a feel for the street."

"...remember that street photography is 99 percent about failure. It’s not just up to me whether a photograph will be successful. The world is my collaborator as well."

"...when I look at a scene, I am sensing not just what seems to be “happening” in front of my eyes and the various shapes that fill the frame, but I am also acutely aware of the colors, their relationship and their emotional and sensory resonances."

The man is the epitome of street ninja. I'm so grateful to have known his work as he continues to inspire me through my photographic journey. Check out Alex Webb's profile page on Magnum Photos to see more of his epic work.